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Guide – Rescue Boat Cox

Guide – Rescue Boat Cox

It is important that the duties below are carried out each Sunday when there is racing at the Club. A rota of members to carry out the duties will be drawn up. If a member is unable to take their turn on the rota it is their responsibility to arrange a replacement and to inform the Sailing Secretary.

The Rescue Boat Cox is responsible for ensuring that a properly manned rescue boat is available at all times during Sunday racing. The Rescue Boat Cox is not expected to carry out all the duties noted by themselves and may enlist help as appropriate.

The Rescue Boat Cox is expected to give up a day’s racing to carry out the duties: they (and their crew) will be credited as having sailed all races on that day and will be given the average of their points for the other races to count in the series, rounded down to the nearest quarter.

Before Racing

  • Be present at the Club at least 30 minutes before the scheduled start
  • (ie by 1030 for the Commodore’s Cup, Vice-Commodore’s Cup and Knock Out Cup;
  • by 1100 on other occasions).
  • Ensure that the Officer of the Day (OOD) knows you are present and has briefed you.
  • Ensure that the rescue boat is available and is adequately crewed for the conditions.
  • Ensure that you know the course to be sailed by each fleet.
  • Ensure that you know the number of starters for each fleet.

During Racing

  • Carry out rescue duties as required.
  • After each race ensure that all participants are accounted for.

After Racing

  • Ensure that all participants are accounted for.
  • Ensure that the rescue boat and tender are properly put away and all faults reported.
  • Refill the fuel tank (including the oil supply) and put it away.
  • Ensure that the fuel locker is locked.
  • Arrange for the replenishment of fuel and oil if required.
Guide – Officer of the Day

Guide – Officer of the Day

The Officer of the Day (OOD) is responsible for ensuring that all the activities associated with Sunday racing for the Enterprise, Mirror, Solo and Laser or handicap fleets run smoothly.  The OOD is not expected to carry out all the duties noted by themselves and may enlist help as appropriate.

The OOD is expected to give up a day’s racing to carry out the duties: they will be credited as having sailed all races on that day and will be given the average of their points for the other races to count in the series, rounded down to the nearest quarter.

Before Racing

  • Be present at the Club at least 30 minutes before the scheduled start (ie by 1030 for the Commodore’s Cup, Vice-Commodore’s Cup and Knock Out Cup; by 1100 on other occasions).
  • Ensure that the urn is filled and switched on.
  • Ensure that the rescue boat is available, is coxed by an authorised person and is adequately crewed for the conditions.
  • Ensure that the rescue boat cox knows what is required of them.
  • Decide on courses appropriate to the conditions and the participants. Post the courses on the board. (Chalk can normally be found either in the drawer of the table under the race results sheets, in or on top of the key cabinet or in one of the drawers in the starter’s box.)
  • Post entry sheets for each fleet sailing.

During Racing

After Racing

  • Ensure that all participants are accounted for.
  • Ensure that the rescue boat and tender have been properly put away and all faults reported.
  • Post the results on the notice board.
  • Ensure that the clubhouse is left in a clean and tidy state.
  • Ensure that the urn is switched off.
Guide – Race Officer

Guide – Race Officer

Being Race Officer for club races does not require god-like qualities, just some confidence and common sense! Sailors are not looking for perfection, just some Sunday afternoon fun.

Before Racing

  • Ensure the Officer of the Day (OOD) knows you are present.
  • Put out an entry sheet and encourage sailors to fill it in – this will make your job easier.
  • Work out which classes are going to be racing.
  • Decide on courses for each class:
    • Try to aim for races 45-60 minutes long.
    • For Enterprises and Mirrors, aim to set courses involving a beat, a reach and a run; RS200s prefer windward-leeward courses.
    • If different fleets are using the same mark, make sure they go the same way round it.
    • Ask the sailors for help – they’ll probably give it anyway.
  • Get all your flags, hooters, watches, crib sheets etc ready … and acquire a tame helper!
  • Think through the start sequence.

The Start

  • Follow the crib sheet carefully.
  • If you make a mistake or lose the place, use the postponement flag.

During the Race

  • Enjoy the view.
  • Think how long the slowest boat is going to take to finish and consider shortening the race.
  • Give each boat a hoot as they finish and record the result.

After the Race

  • Enter the results on the notice board.
  • Tidy up and lock up the starter’s box.

Many thanks for helping to make the racing enjoyable!

Local Services

Local Services

Although St Mary’s Loch can be considered slightly remote – it is a beautiful location which is very rewarding to visit.

Below are links to help you plan your visit.

The Gordon Arms

The Gordon Arms is an old coaching Inn nestling in the Yarrow Valley. It was a favourite haunt of James Hogg, Sir Walter Scott and even Robert Burns was said to have stopped here. Now it is well known for its Music sessions, Real Ale, great traditional food served 7 days a week, 11am to 9pm. 

Call Susan or Tommy on 01750 82261 to check out accomodation or to book a table in the restaurant.

The Glen Cafe

The Glen cafe offers beautiful views over the loch whilst you relaxing in comfortable surroundings. Fresh food individually prepared to order. Open for all day breakfast, a varied lunch menu and home cooking and baking a speciality. Hot and cold drinks and ice cream. Popular with cyclists and bikers.

Outdoor Activities

Whilst we love sailing – we are the first to admit that the wonderful countryside around St Mary’s offers other great outdoor activities. Below are some links giving you ideas on what you can do when there is no wind:

Nearest Towns

There are three major towns located within 15-30 mins drive from the club:

  • Peebles – a Royal Burgh since 1152
  • Selkirk – your closet town at the head of the Ettrick and Yarrow Valleys
  • Moffat – 3 mins from the A74(M)
Wildlife

Wildlife

Ian Malcolm is the club’s resident wildlife expert who has identified almost a 1,000 species in the club grounds. Photographs of some of the species can be seen are in folders in the clubhouse. 

If you would like to become involved in recording what’s on the site or would like more information on what’s there or if you’d simply like to identify something you’ve seen (preferably with a photograph!), please feel free to ask Ian.

Getting involved

The Club’s field is a remarkably wildlife-rich area. Much of it is fairly undisturbed and we make a reasonable effort to maintain the species diversity in those areas that we do actively manage: for example, we try to delay grass-cutting of the main area of the field until the wild flowers have set their seeds. It would be great if we could keep it like this, or even improve it, for those who come after us.

With the advent of digital cameras and the internet, especially sites like iSpot, it has become relatively easy for non-experts to get expert help to identify the species they see around them. Ian has taken advantage of this to begin to compile a list of all the species that we can find in – or above – the club’s land. So far Ian has identified, at least tentatively, almost 1000 species and he knows there are many more to come. Is there just one species of midge biting us? What about all the spiders scuttling about in the grass? And how many different species of bats are flying around at dusk and dawn?

Ian sends all the records to the local biological recording organisation, The Wildlife Information Centre, at Vogrie Country Park. From there it goes to various other recording organisations; some of it has already reached the latest release of the National Biodiversity Network Atlas. All of this will help to monitor the on-going biological health of both the Club’s site and the wider area as well as helping to map the distribution of species across the country.

You can view a gallery of wildlife observed at the Loch here.

Grey Mare’s Tail Nature Reserve

If you want to explore more wildlife then the Grey Mare’s Tail Nature Reserve is a paradise for wildlife enthusiasts who wish to observe the rich collection of some of southern Scotland’s most rare upland plants as well as peregrines, ring ouzels and feral goats. The reserve is a short drive or cycle from the clubhouse.

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